choosing-a-builder

Choosing a Builder

A builder and their subordinates are middlemen. They take your project from a sketch on paper to a building in the real world. Before a brick gets laid, though, you must find a suitable contractor. Here are a few points to choosing a quality builder. Google it Type in the kind of building project you’re […]

office-fitout-points

Points To Consider With An Office Fitout

Office fitouts are an opportunity to establish your business and lay down foundations for your future. Although it’s one thing to say “we’re building an office”, it’s another matter actually doing it. Before you sit down with your contractor, think about these points to save time in discussion.

Space

Too much of it means higher rent. Too little of it means employees will feel shut in. Open-plan office spaces are on the rise as opposed to cubicles and is shown to boost efficiency and a positive atmosphere. Don’t be afraid to be specific about how many square meters you want.

Identity

Your office is the physical form of how you want to present your brand to clients. Impressions last long after they leave. Having brand colours through the office is a good place to start, but using dark colours isn’t recommended. If they’re in your brand’s logo and want to integrate that, use the colours sparingly.

Designers recommend colours that reflect light and promote focus, like warm yellows or offer a sense of calm, like pale blues. “Focusing” colours are meant to be used sparingly in offices. Painting a whole wall red will make employees more agitated than focused. Schemes like this are important to decide on early in the fitout.

Light

Use of natural light is a great way to put workers at ease. People naturally are attracted to the outdoors and shutting them away inside does nobody any favours. Companies organising an office fitout are more conscious of where the best “real estate” is in their space. Rooms with windows are great for meetings because the view will give ambience. Offices with views are still a status symbol and are much coveted.

There’s also the issue of what types of lights to put where. One type of light doesn’t cut it in an office. Brighter types are used in work areas for better focus whereas lower fluorescent lights are fitted in hallways.

Furniture

There might not be much in the budget to splurge on new furniture. A more cost effective and waste-saving option is restoring what you already have. This is a significant saving you can spend elsewhere.

If you do have to buy new fittings, consider multi-purpose items. This includes desks with drawers. Employees can have files in their own work area and in return the general office gets more floor space.

Job Roles on a Commercial Build

Every commercial building project will have various people involved. They seem to be doing similar things but their jobs are quite different, and this leads to some confusion. Example; “aren’t an architect and a builder the same thing?”. No, they’re not. Here is a breakdown on the job titles so that you know who is in charge of what on site.

 

Commercial Builder

A commercial builder or a firm has the resources to get the project off the blueprint and into real life. They have a network of subcontractors like electricians and plumbers on call to get the technical work and heavy lifting done. Builders do as their job title suggests and are seen both on the building site and behind a desk. They have technical knowledge about building codes, building laws as well as how to submit tenders and contracts. Commercial builders work directly with their clients and co-ordinate their sub-contractors to get the work done properly and on time.

Foreperson

On site, foremen are the principals of the schoolyard. They make sure that the rules are being followed on site and that the quality of work is up to standard. Foremen also work as a liaison between the seniors on the project and the trades on site. They’ll give reports to the builder or project manager or get them on the phone when the trades have a question.

Architect

Builders are more about the inside and the technical. Architects work with the outside and how the building appears. They design buildings to a brief depending on what the client wants and make design changes accordingly. They are more involved with the project during the initial planning stages and not seen on site unless called.

Engineer

A structural engineer’s job is vital during the planning stage. They make sure the commercial building will stand for a long time and not collapse because of poor load-bearing. Building services engineering has several subsections. Environmental engineers make sure a project is “green” and sustainable. Electrical engineers work in the “bones” of the project, designing the electrical systems for the building.