office-renovation-trends

Office renovation trends

Office renovations happen because the spaces are outdated, small or a combination of both. Facebook feeds and blogs are now major sources of “renovation inspiration”. News sites provide a platform for companies to show off their new office space, designed to inspire awe and maybe a bit of envy. Here are some trends that are making a splash.

Open-air

Open plan living is more often applied to homes, but it does well in an office renovation. Cubicles are getting replaced in favour of desks where people can work but don’t feel “caged in”.

The benefits of open-plan offices apply to both the workers and the wallet. Employees feel like the office is less confined but they can still work in their own space. On the financial side, the office renovation budget is still intact because the project manager didn’t have to waste money on new cubicles.

Themed spaces

Airbnb is touted as a fun place to work because their offices aren’t the same as everyone else’s. The designers of the offices in Surrey Hills were told to bring a “sense of travel” to the offices. Employees can work in spaces designed and named after locations around the world where the company operates.

office-renovation-airbnb

“Coogee” kitchen in Airbnb’s Sydney office

(Photo credit: www.news.com.au)

When you start your office renovation and want spaces to follow a certain theme, it’s important to talk to the builder and interior designer. The designer will have plenty of ideas and resources to get the look you want. If you’re stuck for ideas, there’s plenty of online resources to get you on the right track.

Au naturel

Wooden panelling is more commonplace in office spaces. Darker woods give a “warmer” aesthetic and a feel of elegance. Recycled timber that was once painted and sanded down gives a more “bohemian” vibe. If the timber is recycled, it’s better for the environment and the budget (because of its low cost).

Another way of reducing the office’s carbon footprint is installing a green wall. The plants act as a “filter” by drawing on excess carbon dioxide and other pollutants. They then supply the space with more oxygen. Plus, from a design point of view green walls in an office are pleasant on the eye.